Ignorance of society evident in the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Analysis & Society

At the beginning of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the river is a symbol of freedom and change. The Royal Nonesuch is a satire for desperation and lack of intellectual amusement within human nature.

Even though the duke and the dauphin are the representation of the unpleasant society that exists they are on of the causes of a union of two people that come from very different sides. The idea of you thinking you had pluck enough to lynch a man!

Through Jim is Huck able to read his surroundings and view society in actuality. Huck bases these decisions on his experiences, his own sense of logic, and what his developing conscience tells him. This results in hypocrisy that constantly plays a crucial part in how Mark Twain depicts the society that participates in such irrational activity.

Regardless of the restrictions and constant fear Jim possesses he consistently acts as a gracious human being and a devoted friend. This is not just a boy running away from home.

As the greatest hypocrisy that took place in the book, was due to the time period itself; a time of white supremacy and racial prejudice, that took place everywhere, a time of slavery. Twain satirizes this aspect of ignorance existing within society through Silas Phelps as well.

Huck remains accepting of new ideas, and he refuses to completely accept the assumptions that the people around him comprise.

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: Social Injustice & Summary

As a poor, uneducated boy, for all intents and purposes an orphan, Huck distrusts the morals and precepts of the society that treats him as an outcast and fails to protect him from abuse.

Miss Watson she kept pecking at me, and it got tiresome and lonesome. He is amazed that while the minister preaches about brotherly love both the Grangerfords and Shepardsons are carrying weapons. Although Twain wrote the novel after slavery was abolished, he set it several decades earlier, when slavery was still a fact of life.

He wants to be free of his abusive father, who goes so far as to literally imprison Huck in a cabin.

Analysis of Hypocrisy in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Even though Widow Douglas considers Huck as a lost child; he acknowledges the idea that she has his best interest at heart. Phelps was a farmer as well as a preacher and, like many farmers of this time period, Phelps owned a few slaves on the farm.

His moral development is sharply contrasted to the character of Tom Sawyer, who is influenced by a bizarre mix of adventure novels and Sunday-school teachings, which he combines to justify his outrageous and potentially harmful escapades.

For Jim the river represents his escape from the society that has him captured and enslaved, and for Huck the river is freedom from the society that causes him to question his morals.

The two main characters, Huck and Jim, both run from social injustice and both are distrustful of the civilization around them. A preacher, who speaks words from the Holy Bible itself, continues to go against its teachings by owning slaves.

This is one of the reasons he was so easily influenced by Tom. Twain reveals the ignorance within society by proving how people state their faith, yet only choose to believe certain understandings of their religion.

He is not some ignorant, uncaring sub-human, but plainly the opposite. Why does Twain use a child as the center of consciousness in this book? Jim conveys an honesty that makes the dissimilarity between him and the characters around him evident. Everyone had taken so much self-esteem into the fact that the nieces had accepted the duke and king as their uncles that no one gave a second thought, even when it was publicly announced by Dr.

Phelps was a farmer as well as a preacher and, like many farmers of this time period, Phelps owned a few slaves on the farm. Although he has been estranged from his wife and children, he misses them dreadfully, and it is only the thought of a lasting separation from them that motivates his unlawful act of running away from Miss Watson.

It also gives us a chance to examine ourselves as well as the society today. The river allows Huck the one thing that Huck wants to be, and that is Huck. This irony brings attention to the ignorance and hypocrisy of society as well. They are so effortlessly honest with their thoughts and this is simply due to the comfort that they provide one another.

The trials and tribulations of coping with the issues of a white society haunt Huck and Jim from the beginning of their journey to the end. However he soon found out about their ongoing feud with a rival family. The river allows Huck the one thing that Huck wants to be, and that is Huck.

Twain satirizes this aspect of ignorance existing within society through Silas Phelps as well. Quite a contrast, the freedom of being without authority, being able to think for yourself, running right next to the constraints made upon you by society.

When Huck is in the presence of Tom it becomes extremely difficult for Huck to stay true to his morals and ideals because he is still just a young boy, and becomes vulnerable to people who are of his age.Adventures of Huckleberry Finn doesn’t only satirize human nature, but society overall.

The satire within Twain’s novel is an extended statement for the instability of American society, by describing society as ignorant, uncivilized, and shamefully idiotic and desperate. In the novel The Adventures Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, a theme of freedom is portrayed.

Huckleberry Finn - Satire to Criticize Society Essay - Part 2

Freedom takes on a different perspective for each character in the novel. In Jim, the runaway slave, and Huck's, the mischievous boy, journey, they obtain freedom.

Mark Twain harshly undermines our society in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Twain himself says, “Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect.” The side of majority in most cases can refer to the norms of society, in which Twain claims is.

Mark Twain uses humor and effective writing to make The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn a satire of the American upper-middle class society in the mid-nineteenth century.

The first aspect of society Twain ridicules is its attempt at respectability. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, takes place in a time in age where the deficits of society are so intricately interwoven and ignored upon the individuals that make up that society.

English Vocab. STUDY. PLAY. Absolute. a group of words that modifies an independent clause "To Kill a Mockingbird" "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" e.g. "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" - Mark Twain. Plot. The event that make up a story or the main part of a story.

Download
Ignorance of society evident in the adventures of huckleberry finn by mark twain
Rated 4/5 based on 95 review